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Pam Peirce

Thank you Darlene! Watsonias aren't as popular here as they once were, but they deserve more attention, especially with our current drought. We do love many of your South African plants.

Darlene Roelofsen

Hi Pam,

I'm from South Africa and love these indigenous beauties. What wonderful photos, and such healthy specimens!

Kind regards,

Darlene

Pam Peirce

Hi Tracy,

I bought the red watsonia bulbs several years ago from Sloat Nursery in San Francisco. They didn't have a variety name. They came from Nurseryman's Exchange, so I spoke to that wholesale nursery, in part because I was including watsonia in my book, Wildly Successful Plants and wanted to see if I could find out what the parents of the hybrid might have been. Unfortunately, they replied that it was one of several hybrids made long ago, and the information about parentage had been lost. Mine are in bud right now, and it looks as though it will be a good year for the plants!

Tracey Novak-Marin

Hello,

The red colored Watsonia in the first 2 photos is very pretty. Do you have more specific information as to the name of the hybrid or the nursery you purchased it from?

Marge Mitchell

I have had a Watsonia plant for three years now. It has tripled in size but has never had any flowers. It is the evergreen type and it gets the afternoon sun. I regularly water with sprinklers. I am now thinking that they should be transplanted!

Pam Peirce

Hi Irene,

Go ahead and plant them. Plant them 4 inches deep. If they are alive, they should be fine. It is OK if they are growing, though it may stunt them a bit the first year not to have roots when they began to grow. Some may not bloom the first year because of this. Assuming they survive, they should be able to bloom normally by the second year.

IRENE KASPER OF SANTA BARBARA, CA

hello,
I HAVE A LOT OF WATSONIA BULBS THAT WEREN'T PLANTED IN SUMMER.
IS IT TOO LATE TO PLANT THEM TODAY (OCT 3)?
IF I CAN'T PLANT THEM NOW, CAN I STORE THEM AWAY FOR NEXT
SUMMER????

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Golden Gate Gardening

The new, updated and expanded third edition of Golden Gate Gardening has more of the information you'll depend on about California microclimates, soils, container gardening, vegetable varieties, herbs, edible flowers, cutting flowers, fruits, managing pests and weeds. Now includes 4 planting calendars, 2 for cool summer microclimates, plus 2 for more inland microclimates. More recipes and tips for learning to harvest and eat from a garden too.

Jan 6, 2010


Wildly Successful Plants

These common and easy to grow California garden plants are being reclaimed by current garden designers for their beauty and sturdiness. Learn how to grow them well, care for them throughout the year, and use them in your garden for reliable, drought-tolerant, year-round color.

Mar 31, 2006

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