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Pam Peirce

Hi Paul,

Invasiveness is partly in the eyes of the beholder. In a food garden, I'm pleased when some plants resow themselves. I enjoy volunteer mustards, arugula, parsley, cilantro, chervil, etc. I even had a volunteer purple-podded pole bean last summer that bore earlier and better than the ones I planted later. Miner's lettuce will self-sow, but has easily recognized, easy to remove, seedlings. if they come up where I don't want them, I just pull them out. In my ornamental garden, I tolerate seedlings of California poppy, breadseed poppy, cineraria, forget-me-not, nasturtium, Virginia stock (Malcolmia maritima), nigella, Johnny-jump-up, and Linaria purpurea, and maybe some others I don't recall right now. Oh, I have some new columbine and bidens seedlings this year, too. When I am weeding, I just remove volunteer seedlings I don't want, or transplant them, if I'd like them to grow somewhere else. I consider miner's lettuce a self-sower that is among those least likely to be a problem. I have had no problem confining it to one or two locations where I can harvest it. It doesn't transplant well, so the trick is to find it a place and remove it if it pops up elsewhere.
Now if I had a garden where nothing was supposed to self-sow ever, I imagine I wouldn't want to grow miner's lettuce. But that garden I would find far less interesting.

paul

Thanks for the tip- I'm wondering though: can miner's lettuce become invasive?

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Golden Gate Gardening

The new, updated and expanded third edition of Golden Gate Gardening has more of the information you'll depend on about California microclimates, soils, container gardening, vegetable varieties, herbs, edible flowers, cutting flowers, fruits, managing pests and weeds. Now includes 4 planting calendars, 2 for cool summer microclimates, plus 2 for more inland microclimates. More recipes and tips for learning to harvest and eat from a garden too.

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Wildly Successful Plants

These common and easy to grow California garden plants are being reclaimed by current garden designers for their beauty and sturdiness. Learn how to grow them well, care for them throughout the year, and use them in your garden for reliable, drought-tolerant, year-round color.

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